Performatik – the Brussels biennale of performance art – turns the spotlight on contemporary performance art or live art in cooperation with a great many Brussels partners. In this way we view this art form not only from the angle of theatre and dance, but also that of visual art, where performance art once flourished and is now coming to the fore once again.

Vito Acconci, the artist who had presented work at Performatik09 and who passed away last year, once claimed that performance art can only ever be a temporary art form in an artist’s oeuvre; one moment that shakes everything up as announcement of a new period. But now that three performance artists won golden lions at the last Venice Biennale, now that performance art is a fixture at art biennials and triennials, and now that you can graduate from visual arts programmes as a performance art artist, ‘immaterial’ art forms appear to have acquired a permanent place in the world of visual art.

Is it a sign of the times that living bodies increasingly occupy museums? Are museums skilfully responding to consumers’ desire for experiences? And do artists avidly adapt, for example by creating a theatre version and a museum version of their work? Or are they searching for new forms and methods of presentation that tamper with the established codes of artworks, audiences, and institutions? Over the past decade, Performatik has decisively opted for the latter. Performance art is an art form that is essentially fragile – and must be.

In this sixth edition, visual artist Laure Prouvost is presenting her first performance work for the stage, and choreographer Noé Soulier confronts the theatre with twenty artworks from the collection of the Centre Pompidou. Historical backdrop of Performatik19 is the Bauhaus movement, which emerged 100 years ago. A number of Bauhaus principles have become deeply relevant again: artisanry versus mass production, the status of the author and the collective, the arts academy as a community of artists, and bringing art closer to everyday life. In the Bauhaus movement, the relationship between bodies and space was foundational to the development of new worldviews. This relationship is also the premise of Radouan Mriziga’s work at Kanal – Centre Pompidou, Jozef Wouters’ work at Decoratelier, and Lotte van den Berg’s Dying Together.

 

→ The complete programme of this sixth edition will be announced in January 2019.

 

PARTNERS: KANAL – Centre Pompidou | Beursschouwburg | Wiels | ARGOS centre for art and media | Bozar | Kaos | La Loge | workspacebrussels | Boghossian Foundation – Villa Empain | CC Strombeek | Centrale For Contemporary Art | Q-O2 | ZSenne artlab

 

Laure Prouvost

They Are Waiting For You

performance

film

installation

They Are Waiting For You
They Are Waiting For You

Kaaitheater

13.03 – 14.03.2019

Radouan Mriziga

0.Kanal

0.Kanal
0.Kanal

KANAL – Centre Pompidou

14.03.2019

Globe Aroma & Decoratelier Jozef Wouters

Passage

performance

Passage
Passage

Decoratelier: Rue de Liverpoolstraat 24, 1080 Brussels

Third Space / Lotte van den Berg

Dying Together

performance

Dying Together
Dying Together

Kaaitheater

16.03 – 17.03.2019

Noé Soulier

Performing Art

performance

Performing Art
Performing Art

Kaaitheater

22.03 – 23.03.2019