#VisuallyStunning

Feast your eyes !

Alix Eynaudi

BRUNO

performance

BRUNO
BRUNO
Wed 09.03 - Thu 10.03.22

Imagine a tower of countless lamps and light sources. It comes to life buzzing, creaking and crackling to the rhythm of switching sounds. Named after the light designer Bruno Pocheron, BRUNO brings together series of dances oscillating between figuration and abstraction with three dancers trying on their movements as if they were clothes: every touch, every gesture, however fugitive, forever printed. 

Radouan Mriziga

Akal

dance

Akal
Akal
Thu 20.01 - Fri 21.01.22

Can choreography be used to fill in the gaps in our historical memory? With Akal, Tamazight for Earth, Radouan Mriziga once again focuses on the knowledge of the Imazighen, the indigenous people of North Africa. In this solo, written for Dorothée Munyaneza, he creates an intimate mix of rituals, traditional dance, architecture, storytelling, song, poetry and rap. A fresh look at an oppressed past.

Radouan Mriziga

7

dance

7
7
Fri 23.10 - Sat 24.10.20

Every age has its wonders of the world: the impossible that people still manage to build – bigger and more impressive than anything we’d seen before. But how remarkable is the small body that invents and creates all these colossuses? In 7, Radouan Mriziga juxtaposes two benchmarks: the built environment, made to impress, and the ultimate wonder of the world: the human body itself.

buren

SPARE TIME WORK

performance music

SPARE TIME WORK
SPARE TIME WORK
Sat 04.06.22

SPARE TIME WORK musically explores thoughts and ideas on (reproductive) labour and leisure. Drenched in different colour spheres, characters like Adult Hood and Young, Grown Woman and Office Worker produce a variety of (power)relations, economical desires and social realities.

Kris Verdonck / A Two Dogs Company

Act

theatre installation

ACT. Johan Leysen plays Beckett
ACT. Johan Leysen plays Beckett
Thu 13.02 - Sat 15.02.20

This curated Beckett evening presents a surprising mix of forms: a monologue by Johan Leysen; a video lecture by philosopher and mathematician Jean Paul Van Bendegem; and a performative scenography as a possible landscape for a Beckett text. Through this combination, Kris Verdonck explores a fascination that he shares with Beckett, namely technology and the increasing conflict between humans and machines.